Here’s How To Study Less And Get Better Grades

Do you want to know how to study in medical school? Interested in knowing how you can study efficiently medical school? More importantly, how do we study less by studying actively in medical school? What study methods help you study less and make higher grades? Keep reading to learn how! Now notice how I said methods instead of method. The truth is different study techniques in medical school will work for different people, but a single person may use many different types of techniques. You must identify which methods will get you the best results with the least amount of time. In this post, I’ve included suggested ways to enhance the effectiveness of commonly used study techniques in medical school. After reading this post you will know many the ways on how to study in medical school. If you prefer a video format then check out my YouTube Video below and my the channel here! This is the first of many to come so be sure to subscribe for weekly videos. Passive vs. Active Studying in Medical School You will hear a lot about passive vs active learning in medical school. If you’re not familiar, passive studying refers to strategies such as reading the syllabus, glancing at the slides, copying your notes verbatim, etc. Active learning, however, includes methods such as practice questions, flashcards, asking questions, and explaining concepts to your peers. While it may seem obvious which method...

The Best Biomedical Research Journals for Staying Informed

In medicine, things are always rapidly changing, and the influx of research often leaves most of us toppling over data, articles, and new ideas to comb through. It’s important for the future healthcare professional and medical scientist to stay up-to-date on the latest advances, changes, and revolutions in biomedical science. For example, the boom of cancer immunotherapies over the past two years has overwhelmed the scientific literature and has been a hot topic of discussion in popular media outlets such as the New York Times. While these articles are often easier to read, highlighting anecdotal stories among interviews with important physicians and scientists involved in the research, they often fail to include primary research and the details of mechanism behind the science. Consequently, reading these articles featured in the media are intellectually interesting, yet lack the “meat” of the primary research. Instead of blasting a search on PubMed to find the latest news in research, I’ve compiled a list of the most relevant, highly esteemed, and trustworthy journals that are necessary in the arsenal of the future doctor and medical researcher. Most of them have highlights sections, editorials, and reviews as well to keep you informed on relevant topics without becoming tangled up in the depths of the original research article itself (though sometimes that is worth it and necessary). This is not a comprehensive list and is influenced...

Reading Before Bed Helps Better Sleep

It’s official: reading before bed has been proven to promote better sleep. Unlike many modern ways of consuming info such as phones and TV, it doesn’t stimulate the brain into staying awake. Discover the benefits of taking a book to bed, and how this can fit in with a good sleep routine below. 6 Minutes to Slumber Infographic by Mattress Online. The Health Scout recounts why sleep matters for pre-med students and medical professionals: A mentor once told me, “Whenever you say ‘yes’ to something, you’re saying ‘no’ to something else.” Sometimes saying ‘yes’ to sleep means my life appears pretty boring from the outside. For example, when I was a 4th year med student on my surgery sub-internship, I woke up at 4:00am every day and usually didn’t get home until 7pm or later. When I got home, I ate dinner while I talked to my husband, showered, and then got in bed around 8:00pm. This was also in July, so I was actually in bed before the sun set every night. This sounds like a really pathetic existence, but I swear I was happy. Giving up some time with my husband after work in favor of getting enough sleep was worth it because I wasn’t exhausted on my days off. I actually had energy to spend time with him. And getting enough sleep helped me perform at my...

The Difference Between Pre-Med and Pre-Dental

Your position on the application waitlist seems to be moving at a glacial pace. And official application decisions begin to trickle in for another group of budding health professionals. Given the abysmal reality of the uncertain application cycle, it becomes easy to develop the “I’ll go anywhere as long as I’m a doctor” mentality. Often students interested in becoming a doctor apply to multiple medical programs (both DO and MD) as well as pre-dental programs with little reflection on how the training and the career trajectory differs. While there is subtle difference between DO and MD program, there is an unmistakable difference between becoming a doctor and becoming a dentist. Students who find themselves in this predicament – choosing what kind of doctor they wish to become – should not make this decision with a fickle heart. As a college student, I remember standing at a career crossroads and genuinely conflicted between choosing medicine and dentistry. I was fiercely passionate about emergency medicine and working as a physician in level 1 trauma center. I was also fired up about medical journalism and so medicine seemed like the best option, allowing me to intertwine two passions into a career. But, the lifestyle and compensation of a dentist was undeniably appealing. Looking back, my rationale for choosing one career over the other was entirely superficial. I wish I was more contemplative...

How To Write A Nursing Resume That Will Get You Hired

When trying to figure out how to write a nursing resume, it’s important to keep in mind your primary goal: show all of your experience and education to set yourself apart and entice hiring managers to call you for an interview. But this focus on getting hired doesn’t mean that once you land a job you should forget about your resume until you start looking again. Instead, as the nursing resume samples show below, your resume is a living document that you should continuously update. Once you understand the basic elements and common mistakes, you can look for ways to improve it, whether by earning an advanced degree, volunteering, or by joining professional organizations. Nursing Resume Basics There are 4 key areas that must be covered when writing your nursing resume. Locations you’ve worked Where you studied and degrees earned Your clinical rotations and how many hours you worked in each Your placements in school Normally, the details of each are included in the nine elements of how to write a nursing resume, listed below. #1: Contact Information Your nursing resume should have all of your contact information front and center. After all, you want your potential employer to be able to easily contact you. Some essential contact information includes: Name Address Phone number Email You should also include any information that can help you stand out from other...

10 Signs That Medicine Is Your Calling Not a Choice

Choosing a career path can be daunting. This dread usually kicks in when we are faced with the task of selecting a major. For some, they grow up knowing what they want to pursue in life. Many have to figure it out, as time goes. I, for one, belong in this category. The job search process helped me explore various options that needed an excellent recommendation letter for job before I settled for freelance writing. Medicine is a lucrative field. And it is one of the areas that has a confident prediction of its outlook. That is, more positions will be opening up in the field of medicine. There will come a time when one seeks satisfaction in what they do. The amount of pay doesn’t matter as much as whether you enjoy what you do or not. Now, what signs will help you determine whether or not, how do you know medicine is your calling? 1. Desire to change lives Some find delight in giving out large sums for a good cause. Others find joy in giving services. In the field of medicine, you will be dealing with the health of others. From prevention, diagnosis to treatment. It all depends on the duties that fall within your purview. One Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, credits his favorite show as a child, St. Elsewhere for showing him is calling. That is to...

So, How Hard is Medical School Anyways?

How hard is medical school anyways? Is it really studying all the time like everyone says? Do you stay in school for years working countless hours? Do all medical students only sleep fours a night? While some of these questions are unfortunately true, others are far from it. For your information, I sleep at least 4.5 hours a night (just kidding). In this post, I’ll break down some of the common questions about medical school. I’ll talk about what it’s like and show you how to overcome the biggest of challenges. How Hard is Medical School? Like anything worth having medical school is a challenge. Is it as scary as most make it out to be? No. Medical school does involve difficult topics, long hours, and countless years devoted to mastering your craft. Many use the fire hydrant analog for medical school. They say learning in medical school is as like trying to drink from a fire hydrant. I instead prefer the pancake analogy. This analogy says that medical school is like having to eat full pancakes every day. Sounds great, doesn’t it? (Who doesn’t love pancakes?) But the catch is that anything you don’t eat today will be added to tomorrow. If you don’t plan your “eating” out, then you’ll become overwhelmed and feel sick. This is how medical school is. It’s a plate full of pancakes every day. Individually it’s...

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